Project icon: lavishly furnished initial letter with a painting of Ptolemy using an astrolab.

Ptolemaeus Arabus et Latinus

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Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat. 16211

s. XIIIex (glosses by another hand mentioning the years 1292 and 1285, f. 1v and 10v) or perhaps XIIIex-XIVin, as suggested by Pedersen.

Or.:

France (Paris?).

Prov.:

MS owned by one Philippe of Dunois (‘Philippus Dunensis’, cf. f. Iv), who bequeathed it to the college of Sorbonne at an unknown date before 1338.

Parchment, II+111 f., a single neat hand, decorated initials.

Astronomy: table of contents, 14th c. (Iv); table of contents, modern (Iv); canons of Toledan tables (1ra-21vb); added astronomical notes (partly fainted), including a table and the Arabic names of months and signs (IIv); Toledan tables (22r-98r); added note ‘Simul est duplex…’ (99r); Pseudo-Thebit Bencora, De motu octave spere (100ra-104ra); Ptolemaica (104rb-108rb); Thebit Bencora, De recta imaginatione spere et circulorum eius diversorum (108rb-110rb); Thebit Bencora (?), De quantitate stellarum et planetarum et proportione terre (110rb-111vb). Blank: Ir, IIr, 98v, 99v.

Lit.

L. Delisle, Le cabinet des manuscrits de la Bibliothèque Nationale, II, Paris, 1874, 170; F. S. Pedersen, The Toledan Tables. A Review of the Manuscripts and the Textual Versions with an Edition, København, 2002, I, 167.

104rb‑108rb

‘Incipit liber Thebith Bechorach de hiis que indigent expositione antequam legatur Almagesti. Equator diei est circulus maior qui describitur super duos polos orbis ― aut propinqui oppositioni erunt retrogradi. Expletus est liber Thebith filii Core de hiis que indigent expositione antequam legatur Almagesti.’