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Ptolemaeus Arabus et Latinus

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Work B.10

Pseudo-Ptolemy
Dixerunt Ptolemeus et Hermes quod locus Lune in hora...

Text

‘(Paris, BnF, lat. 7307, f. 1r) Dixerunt Ptholomeus et Hermes quod locus Lune in hora que infunditur sperma est gradus ascendentis nativitatis, et in loco qui erat gradus ascendentis in hora infusionis spermatis erit Luna in nativitate — et cum eo remanserit equa Lunam et ubi inveneris erit ascendens nativitatis. Dixit magister Abraamis Bendeur: Gradus infusionis spermatis non erit ex toto Lune locus in nativitate vel ipse erit oppositus. Et similiter erit de ascendente nati, id est non erit locus Lune in spermatis infusione vel ipse erit aut ei oppositus ex hoc expertus fuit multotiens.’

Content

A brief text on the rectification of nativities based on the idea that the position of the ascendant at the time of birth is identical with the position of the Moon at the time of conception, i.e. the so-called ‘Trutina Hermetis’.

Origin

This chapter is one of the two additional chapters (with B.4) generally found together with the Centiloquium in Plato of Tivoli’s (B.1.2) and the ‘Mundanorum’ versions (B.1.4), either at the beginning or at the end. It is related to v. 51 of the Centiloquium, which deals with the same topic, but its origin and exact relationship to the Centiloquium remain to be investigated. ‘Abraam Bendeur’ (or ‘Isbendeut’ among other spellings) is perhaps Abraham Ibn Ezra (Sela).

Note

The MSS listed below are only those in which the text occurs independently from the Centiloquium. For more MSS, see B.1.2 and B.1.4.

Bibl.

F. J. Carmody, Arabic Astronomical and Astrological Sciences in Latin Translation. A Critical Bibliography, Berkeley-Los Angeles, 1956, 16-17 (no. 3d); L. Thorndike, ‘Notes upon Some Medieval Latin Astronomical, Astrological and Mathematical Manuscripts at the Vatican’, Isis 47 (1956), 391-404: 394-397; L. Thorndike, ‘Notes on Some Astronomical, Astrological and Mathematical Manuscripts of the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris’, Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 20 (1957), 112-172: 128-129; R. Lemay, Abū Ma‘šar al-Balḫī [Albumasar]: Liber introductorii maioris ad scientiam judiciorum astrorum, Napoli, 1995-1996, IV, 144; R. Lemay, Le Kitāb at-Tamara (Liber fructus, Centiloquium) d’Abū Ja’far Aḥmad ibn Yūsuf [Ps.-Ptolémée], New York, 1999, I, 421-423; J.-P. Boudet, ‘Naissance et conception: autour de la proposition 51 du Centiloquium attribué à Ptolémée’, in De l’homme, de la nature et du monde. Mélanges d’histoire des sciences médiévales offerts à Danielle Jacquart, Genève, 2019, 165-178: 173-177; S. Sela, ‘Calculating Birth: Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Role in the Creation and Diffusion of the Trutina Hermetis’, in Pregnancy and Childbirth in the Premodern World. European and Middle Eastern Cultures, from Late Antiquity to the Renaissance, eds C. Gislon Dopfel, A. Foscati, C. Burnett, Turnhout, 2019, 79-106: 94-95.

Ed.

Thorndike, ‘Notes on Some Astronomical’, 129 (from Paris, BnF, lat. 7307); Boudet, ‘Naissance et conception’, 174-175 (from four MSS).

MSS